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Dirigible Nut

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Posts: 49 Member Since: 02/22/14

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Mar 1 14 2:20 PM

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Here are some general pictures of some of my older models I have hanging around.

Jim.



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Dirigible Nut

Airship Crew Chief

Posts: 49 Member Since:02/22/14

#1 [url]

Mar 1 14 3:18 PM

My 1972-'73  balsa and tissue construction Norge model really is not all that good. It is really very disproportionate. It almost looks cartoonlike in appearance as to the way the actual ship was proportioned. Nonetheless, it is one of my early survivor models that I never crunched in a fit of rage when I was a teen. Here is a more straight broadside view of the little 15" model for what it is worth. Never figured out what the scale is of this model.

It is what it is, for what it is worth.

Jim.



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Dirigible Nut

Airship Crew Chief

Posts: 49 Member Since:02/22/14

#2 [url]

Mar 1 14 4:01 PM

1973 1/200th scale LZ-11 "Viktoria Luise" scale model.

Here are two images of a 1/200th scale model I built of the DELAG airship, "Viktoria Luise" the LZ-11 that I built in around 1973 out of mostly department store gift box cardboard. I built this model to the same scale as my big Hindenburg model to compliment it as the difference in volume size  in between this early Zeppelin and the Hindenburg was really great. It has tissue paper covered balsa wood nose and tail cones, though.I was told by Zeppelin Historian that DELAG airships were not silver, but more of a light yellow tan canvas cotton color, but in the 1970's I did not know that, so the model is what it is. So from a historical viewpoint I was encouraged not to alter to correct it. so the model appears as the way I bult it in 1973, damaged tail fin surfaces and all.

Jim.







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Last Edited By: Dirigible Nut Mar 2 14 5:22 AM. Edited 2 times.

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lta

Assistant Pilot In Command (APIC)

Posts: 132 Member Since:01/18/13

#3 [url]

Mar 1 14 4:24 PM

Can someone say Good Year? The top model is one of the modern good year blimps. My father got it from my uncle and my father gave it to me. It has a small whole in it and it will be needing a refill on air in about 3-4 days. I need to get it fixed.

The bottom one is what some of the first ones looked like. The owner of my local Boyles Tire store gave me this blimp, because they stopped selling Good Year products. It's one of my favorites in my collection. I see you have at least one Jim image
 imageimage

Last Edited By: lta Mar 1 14 4:48 PM. Edited 1 time.

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Dirigible Nut

Airship Crew Chief

Posts: 49 Member Since:02/22/14

#4 [url]

Mar 1 14 4:35 PM

LZ-4

Here is a very tired mostly cardboard and paper model I built also in 1973 of the LZ-4, the first Zeppelin, or any aircraft for that matter to stay aloft for 24 hours straight. After it landed, much to the dismay of Count Ferdinand Von Zeppelin, it was struck by lightning in a bad thunderstorm and was destroyed. Can't remember what German town this all took place in, or the exact year, but I think it may have happened in around 1908(?) As with my Viktoria Luise, this model is approximately 1/200th scale, and was made mostly out of department store gift box cardboard, but this one has paper nose and tail cones with no balsa wood stringer frames inside it. It is spray painted flat white. a little more accurate color than what I painted the Viktoria Luise in. To be 100 percent correct this model should also be a tan/ light yellow cotton canvas color, as I was told, these early actual Zeppelins outer panels were not doped at all, but left unpainted.

Just a note that the Viktoria Luise was a later airship than the LZ-4, which was still basically an experimental ship. It was about 400 feet long. The LZ-4, that is.

Jim.

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Last Edited By: Dirigible Nut Mar 6 14 2:08 PM. Edited 2 times.

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Dirigible Nut

Airship Crew Chief

Posts: 49 Member Since:02/22/14

#5 [url]

Mar 1 14 5:25 PM

1971 solid carved balsa wood "Mayflower" N1-A Goodyear Blimp.

I believe you are referring  to this model, LTA. This is my oldest surviving scratch built airship model. It is of the Goodyear blimp "Mayflower", registry N1-A which was flying in the mid to late 1960's to early 1970's when I was a kid. It was of the hull envelope type GZ-19. It was the last of it's kind to be built and flown by the Goodyear Airship division of the Goodyear Tire and Rubber Company. Subseqent blimps built by them were the bigger 200 foot long GZ-20 types. The GZ-19  blimps were about 150 feet long.

I hand carved and sanded the hull of this model to shape out of a solid block of balsa wood, then added cardboard fins and balsa gondola to the model. sealed the wood pores, then I hand painted it. This model is only about 8 inches long,and it was scratch built in 1971 by me.. It is also very disproportionate, and not a very accurate model. Here is a clearer picture of it.

Jim.

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Dirigible Nut

Airship Crew Chief

Posts: 49 Member Since:02/22/14

#7 [url]

Mar 1 14 7:48 PM

Different model of the same airship? Yes you can say that. but those blowup promotional Goodyear blimp models, the design of those were more toy-like than they were model of a specific blimp design. The only real thing that matches in between it and my little balsa model is the color scheme of the thing. They were very generic. otherwise. The blowup models, that is. For a time in the early '70's you could buy these big 2 foot blowup blimps at Goodyear stores for I believe $5.00 a piece. I have one of those earlier 1970's blowups hanging in my basement work shop, too, as it is too big for the space I have left in my hobby room that I have left for hanging models. The space is starting to get very limited in supply. They do consistantly slowly lose air and they need topped off from time to time, even though mine does not have any holes in it.

Jim.

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lta

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Posts: 132 Member Since:01/18/13

#8 [url]

Mar 1 14 9:09 PM

Most of mine toy models I collected when I was younger. Do you recall any hot wheel blimps from the 90s and 00s?

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Dirigible Nut

Airship Crew Chief

Posts: 49 Member Since:02/22/14

#9 [url]

Mar 2 14 4:56 PM

R-100 scratch built from 1973

Here is my 30" long scratch built R-100 model that I built in--- you guessed it, 1973. It has a full balsa wood ring and keel framework, covered with silkspan model aircraft paper, carved balsa control car, fins, and engine gondolas .

Jim.

 

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Last Edited By: Dirigible Nut Mar 2 14 5:03 PM. Edited 1 time.

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lta

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#10 [url]

Mar 3 14 3:17 PM

Some built an rc of this airship didn't they? It maybe another airship I am thinking of.

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Dirigible Nut

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Posts: 49 Member Since:02/22/14

#11 [url]

Mar 3 14 3:29 PM

Yeah, you are right, I just can't think who it was. He was on the old forum, and he posted a link to video of it in action. He also did a flying model of I think the LZ-6 about a year ago before Charles pulled the plug on the forum. I think I know how to find out who that was.

Nope. I could not find him. I think his name is Allen, but I can't think of his last name... :P

Jim.

Last Edited By: Dirigible Nut Mar 3 14 3:44 PM. Edited 1 time.

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Dirigible Nut

Airship Crew Chief

Posts: 49 Member Since:02/22/14

#12 [url]

Mar 4 14 2:57 PM

My messed up Revell of Germany Hindenburg built up. I think I did this about 10 years ago. Screwed up on sealing the decals wrong. I should have dull clear top coated the model FIRST before I applied the decals, but I applied them directly to the silver paint instead. Then I sealed them in with white glue before I top coated the model. This had the effect in keeping the topcoating from dulling the area where the decals are at, ruining the looks of the whole model. Fortunately I have another one of these kits that I got from I think Paul Adams about 5 years ago while the old forum was still up and running. I have a second chance of doing this kit right. Among other things the promenade windows are glued in crooked , and I messed up the control car by painting the windows in it. Sloppy workmanship on my behalf. Here it is dust, cobwebs, and all.

Jim.



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lta

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Posts: 132 Member Since:01/18/13

#13 [url]

Mar 4 14 5:29 PM

Hey it still looks pretty nice. I have the newest Revel model of the Hindenburg. I think it came pretty nice. It's the Olympia version though. Can you guys tell me about this version of the ship.. Iv never seen a picture of the Olympia Hindenburg. image 

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Dirigible Nut

Airship Crew Chief

Posts: 49 Member Since:02/22/14

#14 [url]

Mar 5 14 2:36 AM

"Olympia" I believe is the German word for "Olympics". In 1936, the Olympics were held in Munich, Germany. Then Chancellor Hitler ordered the Olympic rings painted on the sides of the airship that year in honor of the Olympics being held in Germany. For the start of the 1937 flight schedule of the airship, these were removed. The model kit you have gives the ring decals so that you can do it up as the 1936 "Olympics" version, or you can leave them off to do the 1937 ship, without the rings on it. That's all.

Jim.

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Zeppelin Historian

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Posts: 30 Member Since:03/01/14

#15 [url]

Mar 6 14 12:59 PM

R 100 RC model and "Olympia-Hindenburg"

First, the RC model of the R 100 had been built by Alan Sherwood from Australia. This model is quite an achievement because it is - as I believe - the smallest fully radio controlled rigid airship model in the world.

image

And it REALLY IS SMALL - smaller than my display models for the museum...

image

Then you asked about the "Hindenburg" with the Olympic Rings. Jim told you all about it - except for two things - first, the Olymic rings were on the airship before it got its name as some people wanted to name it "Adolf Hitler" (see first picture below) and second, there were some more chenges for the 1937 season (see below). But here are some pictures first.

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Now to the one big change that Jim did not tell you. In the winter of 1936/1937 the LZ 129 "Hindenburg" underwent several alterations. Besides removing the Olympic rings, it got 10 new passenger cabins which had been located on the starboard side behind the B-deck. And as these new cabins had windows they were visible from the outside - as the picture below shows. This seems to be the only picture which shows these additional windows - and you can also see that the Olympic rings are gone.

image

The model kits - the one from Revell and the one from AMT - do not have these additional windows. And therefore, you can only build the 1936 version of the "Hindenburg" and not the configuration in which it crashed - or you would have to put some additional efforts in your model...

Best regards,
Andreas




 

Last Edited By: Zeppelin Historian Mar 6 14 1:03 PM. Edited 1 time.

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Dirigible Nut

Airship Crew Chief

Posts: 49 Member Since:02/22/14

#16 [url]

Mar 6 14 2:18 PM

The model kit also does not give you the third decal "D-LZ129" that is needed that was on the very top midships of the hull. I only ever saw one clear picture of this detail on the actual ship, and that was back in the early 1970's when I was studying the airship to build my four foot model. Also, the hyphen is missing from the ship's registry number on the decals in the kit.

Just an addendum to what Andreas said.

Jim.

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lta

Assistant Pilot In Command (APIC)

Posts: 132 Member Since:01/18/13

#17 [url]

Mar 6 14 2:58 PM

Hey thanks guys for the information. I have never seen those pictures before that Zeppelin Historian has posted. Very interesting.

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Zeppelin Historian

Airship Crew Chief

Posts: 30 Member Since:03/01/14

#18 [url]

Mar 9 14 4:23 PM

Yes, Jim is right! There also was a registry number on top of the airships LZ 127, LZ 129 and LZ 130.

Interestingly, as the following pictures show, the number on the LZ 129 is on the starboard side of the top girder and it is readable from port, while on the LZ 130 it is on the port side of the top girder and must be read from starboard.
Unfortunately, the picture of LZ 129 is not very clear as the number is barely visible. This is at the moment the only digitalized  picture I have of LZ 129 which shows its registry number on the top but I also post this picture because it is one of my favorite photographs with the "Los Angeles" (LZ 126) in the background and with the huge rail car underneath the lower fin of the "Hindenburg". The fin is not yet attached to it or it had just been released.

image

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Hlostoops

Airship Crew Chief

Posts: 17 Member Since:02/27/14

#19 [url]

Mar 11 14 1:32 PM

Does anyone know the purpose of a registry number on top of the airship(s)? I can understand having one beneath them (to be visible from the ground), but, it seems rather pointless to position one on the 'roof' of the ship, especially considering the standing orders not to fly planes directly above or below.

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parseval pask

Airship Crew Chief

Posts: 46 Member Since:07/02/13

#20 [url]

Mar 14 14 11:40 AM

A zeppelin employee probably had too much time on his hands.

Alan.

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